Entity Framework mocking requires global context

c# dbcontext entity-framework entity-framework-6 unit-testing

Question

I have recently began to dig into Entity Framework unit-testing with Entity Framework 6 mocking.

I have noticed the following thing:

Entity Framework mocking forces me to create a global context in my BL class, for example:

public class RefundRepayment : IDisposable
{
    protected DbContext _dbContext = new DbContext();

    /* more properties and class code */

    public void Dispose()
    {
        _dbContext.Dispose();
    }
}

I can't quite figure it out, as I'd rather implement the using statement in every method in order to deal with the DbContext, my code will look like:

public class RefundRepayment
{
    /* more properties and class code */
    public void AccessDb() 
    {
        using(DbContext dbContext = new DbContext())
        {
            /* db code here */
        }
    }
}

Is there any specific reason why should we initialize a global context instead of implementing the using statement?

1
0
8/27/2018 8:18:00 AM

Accepted Answer

First off, you need to be using DI (via ninject, Unity, Core, etc) to pull this off.

Let me show you a simple sample of an EF GetAll() testing my MVC controller.

[Fact]
public void GetAllOk()
{
    // Arrange

    // Act
    var result = _controller.GetAll() as OkObjectResult;

    // Assert
    Assert.NotNull(result);
    var recordList = result.Value as List<DTO.Account>;
    Assert.NotNull(recordList);
    Assert.Equal(4, recordList.Count);
}

It relies on this startup code...

public class AccountsControllerTests
{
    DatabaseFixture _fixture;
    AccountsControllerV1 _controller;

    public AccountsControllerTests(DatabaseFixture fixture)
    {
        _fixture = fixture;
        _controller = new AccountsControllerV1(_fixture._uow);
    }

What is DatabaseFixture? Glad you asked...

public class DatabaseFixture : IDisposable
{
    public ApplicationDbContext _context;
    public DbContextOptions<ApplicationDbContext> _options;
    public IUoW _uow;

    public DatabaseFixture()
    {
        var x = Directory.GetCurrentDirectory();
        var config = new ConfigurationBuilder()
            .AddJsonFile("appsettings.Tests.json", optional : true)
            .Build();

        _options = new DbContextOptionsBuilder<ApplicationDbContext>()
            .UseInMemoryDatabase(databaseName: "ProviderTests")
            .Options;

        _context = new ApplicationDbContext(_options);
        _context.Database.EnsureCreated();
        Initialize();

        _uow = new UoW(_context);
    }

    private void Initialize()
    {
        _context.Accounts.Add(new Entities.Account() { AccountNumber = "Number 1", AccountID = "", AccountUniqueID = "" });
        _context.Accounts.Add(new Entities.Account() { AccountNumber = "Number 2", AccountID = "", AccountUniqueID = "" });
        _context.Accounts.Add(new Entities.Account() { AccountNumber = "Number 3", AccountID = "", AccountUniqueID = "" });
        _context.Accounts.Add(new Entities.Account() { AccountNumber = "Number 4", AccountID = "", AccountUniqueID = "" });
        _context.SaveChanges();
    }

    public void Dispose()
    {
        // Clean Up
        _context.Database.EnsureDeleted();
    }
}

[CollectionDefinition("Database Collection")]
public class DatabaseCollection : ICollectionFixture<DatabaseFixture>
{
}

A few definitions used in the above code. I used a Unit of Work Pattern that contains references to all my EF repositories. I kept Entity (Database) classes and DTO (Data Transfer Object) Classes separate. I used an in-memory replacement for the EF database that I initialize at the beginning of each run and/or test so that my data is always known. I inject the Database Fixture into my test class (not each test) so I am not creating/destroying constantly. Then I create my controller passing in my database UoW definition.

You're real controller requires injection of the UoW container you've created with the real database. You are merely substituting a controlled database environment for your test.

public AccountsControllerV1(IUoW uow)
{
    _uow = uow;
}

And yes, I use versioning for the sharp-eyed. And yes, this is a Core 2 example. Still applicable for EF 6, just need 3rd party DI ;)

And the controller method I am testing?

[HttpGet("accounts", Name ="GetAccounts")]
public IActionResult GetAll()
{
    try
    {
        var recordList = _uow.Accounts.GetAll();

        List<DTO.Account> results = new List<DTO.Account>();
        if (recordList != null)
        {
            results = recordList.Select(r => Map(r)).ToList();
        }

        log.Info($"Providers: GetAccounts: Success: {results.Count} records returned");
        return Ok(results);
    }
    catch (Exception ex)
    {
        log.Error($"Providers: GetAccounts: Failed: {ex.Message}");
        return BadRequest($"Providers: GetAccounts: Failed: {ex.Message}");
    }
}
1
8/27/2018 6:54:22 PM


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