How to trace an Entity Framework Core event for integration testing?

.net-core c# entity-framework-core

Question

We need to ensure that EF Core-based code has performed a specific kind of database-level operation under test (for example, any command execution or any transaction commit).

Let's suppose a real database should be triggered and we can't isolate it by DbContext mocking. How could it look:

[Fact]
public async Task Test()
{
    using (var context = new FooContext())
    {
        //context-related code to produce queries and commands
    }

    Assert.True(/* any context-related transaction has been committed */);
}

Is it possible?

1
3
5/21/2017 8:35:28 AM

Accepted Answer

EF Core doesn't provide its own tracing mechanism. However, it logs a lot of database interaction events. We could gather these log messages and check their EventId to determine did a specific operation occur or not. Here is the list of relational events used by EF Core:

EF Core 1.1.2: RelationalEventId enum.

EF Core 2.0.0 preview 1: RelationalEventId class (breaking change!).

All we need to do is create a fake logger and pass it to context:

[Fact]
public async Task TransactionCommit_Logger_ContainsEvent()
{
    var logger = new FakeLogger();

    var factoryMock = new Mock<ILoggerFactory>();
    factoryMock.Setup(f => f.CreateLogger(It.IsAny<string>()))
        .Returns(logger);

    using (var context = new FooContext(factoryMock.Object))
    {
        using (var transaction = await context.Database.BeginTransactionAsync())
        {
            transaction.Commit();
        }
    }

    Assert.True(logger.Events.Contains((int)RelationalEventId.CommittingTransaction));
}

FakeLogger adds a logged event id to the Events list.

public class FakeLogger : ILogger
{
    public void Log<TState>(LogLevel logLevel, EventId eventId, TState state, Exception exception,
        Func<TState, Exception, string> formatter)
    {
        Events.Add(eventId.Id);
    }

    public List<int> Events { get; set; } = new List<int>();

    public bool IsEnabled(LogLevel logLevel) => true;

    public IDisposable BeginScope<TState>(TState state) => null;
}    

Call UseLoggerFactory to attach a factory instance to a context:

public class FooContext : FooParentContext
{
    private readonly ILoggerFactory _loggerFactory;

    public FooContext() { }

    public FooContext(ILoggerFactory loggerFactory)
    {
        _loggerFactory = loggerFactory;
    }

    protected override void OnConfiguring(DbContextOptionsBuilder optionsBuilder)
    {
        base.OnConfiguring(optionsBuilder);

        optionsBuilder.UseLoggerFactory(_loggerFactory);
    }
}

P.S. You could go even deeper and analyze log message or even raw SQL produced by EF.

4
5/23/2017 12:26:35 PM


Related Questions





Related

Licensed under: CC-BY-SA with attribution
Not affiliated with Stack Overflow
Licensed under: CC-BY-SA with attribution
Not affiliated with Stack Overflow